I Asked Twitter If Anyone Still Listens to Podcasts Since ODEO And You Won’t Believe What Happened Next:

Wikipedia’s page on Twitter reminds us that:

Twitter’s origins lie in a “daylong brainstorming session” held by board members of the podcasting company Odeo. Dorsey, then an undergraduate student at New York University, introduced the idea of an individual using an SMS service to communicate with a small group…The first Twitter prototype, developed by Dorsey and contractor Florian Weber, was used as an internal service for Odeo employees and the full version was introduced publicly on July 15, 2006.

In conclusion: ODEO is dead, podcasts are still kicking, and Twitter is a decent place to find out what people are listening to.

Thanks to @zachlieberman, @ekstasis, @robinrendle, @patrickneville, and @trufelman for the recommendations.

“In short, Moses had discovered a governmental institution that was not only uniquely suited to his purposes but was, in institutional terms, and embodiment of his personality, an extension of himself. ‘An institution,’ said Ralph Waldo Emerson,‘ is the lengthened shadow of one man.’ The institution named ‘the public authority’ was, in the form it took after Moses’ eyes focused on it in 1937 and 1938, the lengthened shadow of Robert Moses. He himself seemed to understand this. His remarks and, sometimes, his published statements, reveal a striking identification of himself with authorities, which he defined as ‘nonpolitical’ organizations headed by ‘unsalaried’ trustees in which ‘the speed, flexibility and absence of red tape, traditionally associated with private industry,’ could be used for public purposes.”
“In short, Moses had discovered a governmental institution that was not only uniquely suited to his purposes but was, in institutional terms, and embodiment of his personality, an extension of himself. ‘An institution,’ said Ralph Waldo Emerson,‘ is the lengthened shadow of one man.’ The institution named ‘the public authority’ was, in the form it took after Moses’ eyes focused on it in 1937 and 1938, the lengthened shadow of Robert Moses. He himself seemed to understand this. His remarks and, sometimes, his published statements, reveal a striking identification of himself with authorities, which he defined as ‘nonpolitical’ organizations headed by ‘unsalaried’ trustees in which ‘the speed, flexibility and absence of red tape, traditionally associated with private industry,’ could be used for public purposes.”
75 pages of notes from a 2 week program that I did with Triple Canopy last month on networked publishing, conceptual reading and writing, interfaces, economies, publics, etc. (warning: 22mb pdf)

75 pages of notes from a 2 week program that I did with Triple Canopy last month on networked publishing, conceptual reading and writing, interfaces, economies, publics, etc. (warning: 22mb pdf)